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How Should Divorced Parents Handle COVID-19 Vaccinations?

Posted on in Single Dad Survival

divorced dad attorney children's health COVID-19While the coronavirus pandemic has affected us all, the ongoing rollout of vaccines has provided some hope that there is an end in sight to this difficult situation. Even though it may still be several months before vaccines become available to many people, planning to address these issues can help families minimize their risks. While parents will want to determine how to handle vaccinations for themselves and their children, divorced parents may face additional complications when addressing these issues. Since they will want to be sure they, their children, and their extended family members will be protected from potential infections, parents will want to work with each other to determine how to approach vaccinations while also keeping each other informed about health issues that may affect their children.

Vaccinations for Parents and Other Family Members

While COVID-19 vaccines are currently being distributed, the limited quantities available mean that certain people will have priority for receiving vaccinations. Currently, health care workers are being vaccinated, since they are at the highest risk of exposure. People who are at the highest risk of suffering severe illness due to a COVID-19 infection are also being prioritized, including the elderly and people who live in nursing homes or assisted living facilities.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending that people receive the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to them. While receiving the vaccine will provide a person with protection, everyone should continue to follow the CDC’s recommendations for preventing the spread of infection, including wearing masks, staying at least six feet away from others, avoiding crowded or poorly-ventilated areas, and washing their hands frequently.

When Can Children Be Vaccinated?

While parents will want to understand when they can receive a vaccine, they are also likely concerned about how they can take the proper measures to protect their children from infection. Of the two vaccines that have been approved in the United States, the Pfizer vaccine is authorized for use by people who are at least 16 years old, while the Moderna vaccine is available for those who are at least 18. Clinical trials are currently being conducted for children below the age of 16, and it is hoped that a vaccine will be available for younger children by the end of 2021.

Children are at the lowest risk of suffering serious harm due to COVID-19 infection. While children can become sick, the likelihood that they will become seriously ill is much lower than for other people, and fewer than 200 children have died in the United States due to COVID-19. However, parents will still want to make sure their children are safe, so until a vaccine is available for children, they should continue to follow the proper safety precautions.

Divorced parents will usually need to work together to make decisions about their children’s healthcare. In cases where parents share legal custody of children, they will both have a say in these decisions, so they will need to communicate with each other and make sure they are on the same page about the treatments children will receive and the measures that should be taken to protect their health and safety. In cases where parents disagree about what is best for their children, the terms of their parenting agreement can help them determine the best ways to resolve these issues while providing for their children’s needs.

Contact a Child Custody Lawyer

If you are currently going through a divorce, you’ll want to be sure you understand how you and your ex will address issues related to your children’s health. A skilled divorce attorney can help you create a parenting plan that will meet your family’s needs while also protecting your parental rights. Your lawyer can also work with you to address any concerns you may have about your children’s safety, providing you with peace of mind that they will be healthy and free from harm, no matter what happens.

 

Sources:

https://www.hackensackmeridianhealth.org/HealthU/2020/12/22/when-will-my-child-be-able-to-get-the-covid-19-vaccine/

https://www.cnet.com/health/why-children-cant-get-the-covid-19-vaccine-yet-heres-who-else-may-have-to-wait/

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

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